Album Review | #Bloomerangs Offer Moments and Fragments

#Bloomerangs are an Indiana-based jazz collective espousing an array of global influences on their new record, Moments and Fragments. Although rooted in jazz, the outfit seamlessly performs genre-swapping pieces while also remaining accessible to the average listener.

Album opener ‘Home’ is a chill, bluesy track kicking off with piano stylings and beefy, progressive support from the guitar. Rhythmically, there’s a soft but rolling touch from the airtight bass and drums, while the lead guitar lines are clever and harmonically rich.

By contrast, ‘Leaps and Bounds’ has a more hurried pace, complemented by sprinklings of slick piano lines from Clay Wulbrecht. The piece is chock-full of curious, mesmerizing melodies, along with a handy drum and bass interchange which holds down the rhythm.

The inventive and playful nature of jazz is rampant across Moments and Fragments. The chemistry between group members is evident as they effortlessly trade the spotlight without egos getting in the way.

Swinging in with odd time signatures is the piano-driven ‘Catch a Clue’. Rambling guitar lines and pouty drums dance in a trade-off amidst the improv-fueled action, as all members show off their technical proficiency without killing the vibe.

The latter half of the record explores a more atmospheric tone with greater experimentation. While the anxious tones on ‘Change of Pace’ border on modern rock, they are fused with an ominous ambience. Following this, ‘Mind Your F’ mollifies the situation with gliding harmonics and pretty bell tones. This one certainly hits a peak for meditative serenity on the record.

Last is ‘That Sums It Up’, with almost jarring guitar riffs over glowing piano voicings and flashy drum fills. The drumming brings a lot of variety and personality to the table via sharp snare cracks, rolling toms, and intermittent splashes. As the crescendo begins, there is an almost psychedelic flair to their musical union.

Jazz schooling may be the core of #Bloomerangs’ mindset, but their playful use of other genres offers an insight into just how flexible jazz is. These musicians’ ears are not glued to the past, however, their fusion is far-reaching and modern in selection.


4/5


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